Bibles

Mark 1:7 Commentary - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

7. The latchet The word latchet signifies a fastener of some kind. It is allied to the latch of a door, to the word lock; and is derived from the Latin ligo, to fasten. It here signifies a shoe-string. In Matthew the phrase is, “whose shoes I am not worthy to bear.” Perhaps John, on different occasions, used both expressions.

Consult other comments:

Mark 1:7 - The Greek Testament

Mark 1:7 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Mark 1:7 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Mark 1:7 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Mark 1:7 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Mark 1:7 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:7 - Mr. D's Notes on Selected New Testament Books by Stanley Derickson

Mark 1:7 - Expositors Bible Commentary

Mark 1:7 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:7 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Mark 1:7 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Mark 1:7 - Geneva Bible Notes

Mark 1:7 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Mark 1:7 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Mark 1:7 - William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:7 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Mark 1:7 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Mark 1:7 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Mark 1:7 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Mark 1:7 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Mark 1:7 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:7 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:7 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Mark 1:7 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Mark 1:7 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:7 - Combined Bible Commentary

Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments