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Mark 1:25 Commentary - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

25. Hold thy peace Jesus was careful to guard himself and his own cause from every token of sympathy with the infernal beings, and so drew a most palpable line of hostility between them and himself. This he did probably to prevent all colouring for the Jews to say that there was collusion between him and them; or that he cast out devils through diabolical confederacy and power. Yet our Lord did not veil himself from their perception, nor prevent their expressing their first recognition of him; knowing their language concerning him would be of such a character as to indicate that they feared and dreaded him as their worst enemy.

Consult other comments:

Mark 1:25 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Mark 1:25 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Mark 1:25 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Mark 1:25 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:25 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:25 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Mark 1:25 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Mark 1:25 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Mark 1:25 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Mark 1:25 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Mark 1:25 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Mark 1:25 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Mark 1:25 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Mark 1:25 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Mark 1:25 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:25 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:25 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Mark 1:25 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Mark 1:25 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:25 - Combined Bible Commentary

Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments