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Verses of Colossians 1

15

Colossians 1:15 Commentary - The Apologists Bible Commentary

The Apologists Bible Commentary

Colossians 1

15 - 16 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. For by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities-- all things have been created through Him and for Him.

C o m m e n t a r y from Adam Clarke's Commentary ... Who is the image of the invisible God - The counterpart of God Almighty, and if the image of the invisible God, consequently nothing that appeared in him could be that image; for if it could be visible in the Son, it could also be visible in the Father; but if the Father be invisible, consequently his image in the Son must be invisible also. This is that form of God of which he divested himself; the ineffable glory in which he not only did not appear, as to its splendor and accompaniments, but concealed also its essential nature; that inaccessible light which no man, no created being, can possibly see. This was that Divine nature, the fullness of the Godhead bodily, which dwelt in him. The first-born of every creature - I suppose this phrase to mean the same as that, Phi 2:9 : God hath given him a name which is above every name; he is as man at the head of all the creation of God; nor can he with any propriety be considered as a creature, having himself created all things, and existed before any thing was made. If it be said that God created him first, and that he, by a delegated power from God, created all things, this is most flatly contradicted by the apostle's reasoning in the 16th and 17th verses. As the Jews term Jehovah becoro shel olam, the first-born of all the world, or of all the creation, to signify his having created or produced all things; (see Wolfius in loc.) so Christ is here termed, and the words which follow in the 16th and 17th verses are the proof of this. The phraseology is Jewish; and as they apply it to the supreme Being merely to denote his eternal pre-existence, and to point him out as the cause of all things; it is most evident that St. Paul uses it in the same way, and illustrates his meaning in the following words, which would be absolutely absurd if we could suppose that by the former he intended to convey any idea of the inferiority of Jesus Christ (Clarke ). from Jamieson, Fausset, Brown... Col 1:15 - They who have experienced in themselves "redemption" (Col 1:14), know Christ in the glorious character here described, as above the highest angels to whom the false teachers (Col 2:18) taught worship was to be paid. Paul describes Him: (1) in relation to God and creation (Col 1:15-17); (2) in relation to the Church (Col 1:18-20). As the former regards Him as the Creator (Col 1:15-16) and the Sustainer (Col 1:17) of the natural world; so the latter, as the source and stay of the new moral creation. image--exact likeness and perfect Representative. Adam was made "in the image of God" (Gen 1:27). But Christ, the second Adam, perfectly reflected visibly "the invisible God" (1Ti 1:17), whose glories the first Adam only in part represented. "Image" (eicon) involves "likeness" (homoiosis); but "likeness" does not involve "image." "Image" always supposes a prototype, which it not merely resembles, but from which it is drawn: the exact counterpart, as the reflection of the sun in the water: the child the living image of the parent. "Likeness" implies mere resemblance, not the exact counterpart and derivation as "image" expresses; hence it is nowhere applied to the Son, while "image" is here, compare 1Co 11:7 [TRENCH]. (Joh 1:18; Joh 14:9; 2Co 4:4; 1Ti 3:16; Heb 1:3). Even before His incarnation He was the image of the invisible God, as the Word (Joh 1:1-3) by whom God created the worlds, and by whom God appeared to the patriarchs. Thus His essential character as always "the image of God," (1) before the incarnation, (2) in the days of His flesh, and (3) now in His glorified state, is, I think, contemplated here by the verb "is." first-born of every creature-- (Heb 1:6), "the first-begotten": "begotten of His Father before all worlds" [Nicene Creed]. Priority and superlative dignity is implied (Psa 89:27). English Version might seem to favor Arianism, as if Christ were a creature. Translate, "Begotten (literally, 'born') before every creature," as the context shows, which gives the reason why He is so designated. "For," &c. (Col 1:16-17) [TRENCH]. This expression is understood by ORIGEN (so far is the Greek from favoring Socinian or Arian views) as declaring the Godhead of Christ, and is used by Him as a phrase to mark that Godhead, in contrast with His manhood [Book 2, sec. Against Celsus] (JFB ).

F u r t h e r R e a d i n g Articles... Old Testament Background of the Firstborn : Dr. Robert Keay on Col 1:15 The Structure and Rhetoric of Colossians 1:15-20 : Luis C. Reyes (hosted by Bible Studies on the Web ) The Latest JW Argument from Col 1:15 Ray Goldsmith Is Prototokos a 'Partitive Word?' Luis C. Reyes Dialogs... Ray Goldsmith and Wes Williams on Col 1:15

Verses of Colossians 1

15

Consult other comments:

Colossians 1:15 - Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - The Greek Testament

Colossians 1:15 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Colossians 1:15 - Beet's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Colossians 1:15 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - Calvin's Complete Commentary

Colossians 1:15 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Colossians 1:15 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Colossians 1:15 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Colossians 1:15 - College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

Colossians 1:15 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Colossians 1:15 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Colossians 1:15 - Mr. D's Notes on Selected New Testament Books by Stanley Derickson

Colossians 1:15 - Commentary on the Greek Text of Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians and Phillipians

Colossians 1:15 - Expositors Bible Commentary

Colossians 1:15 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Colossians 1:15 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Colossians 1:15 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Colossians 1:15 - Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Colossians 1:15 - Geneva Bible Notes

Colossians 1:15 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Colossians 1:15 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Colossians 1:15 - The Apologists Bible Commentary

Colossians 1:15 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Colossians 1:15 - Commentaries on the New Testament and Prophets

Colossians 1:15 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Colossians 1:15 - The Popular Commentary on the Bible by Kretzmann

Colossians 1:15 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Colossians 1:15 - Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Colossians 1:15 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Colossians 1:15 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Colossians 1:15 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Colossians 1:15 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

Colossians 1:15 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Colossians 1:15 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Colossians 1:15 - You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

Colossians 1:15 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Colossians 1:15 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Colossians 1:15 - Combined Bible Commentary

The Apologists Bible Commentary