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Verses of Mark 1

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Mark 1:1 Commentary - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Foreknowledge of the Gospel of Jesus Christ The opening verses of the Gospel of Mark declare the institution of the Gospel of Jesus Christ upon earth as predicted in Old Testament prophecy through the divine foreknowledge of God the Father . Two Old Testament prophecies of the coming of John the Baptist are used to open the Gospel of Mark (Mar 1:2-3), serving a two-fold emphasis. First, they refer to the coming of John the Baptist to preach the Gospel of the coming of the Messiah, and second, they speak figuratively of him turning the hearts of the people to God, using the words “Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” These prophetic passages establish John’s ministry as a part of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. These verses also reflect the foundational theme of the four Gospels, which is the claim that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. These verses also reflect Mark’s secondary theme, which is the witness to Jesus’ deity through the preaching of the Gospel, beginning with John the Baptist, who claimed that Jesus was the Christ, the Messiah, and the Son of God. He preached the mystery of godliness, of how God was manifested in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen of angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world and how He was received up into glory (1Ti 3:16).

1Ti 3:16, “And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness: God was manifest in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen of angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up into glory.”

Mar 1:1  The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God;

Mar 1:1 “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ” - Word Study on “the gospel” Webster says the English word “gospel” is derived from the old English word “godspel” (God story), and serves as the translation of the Greek word ευ ̓ αγγε ́ λιον .

Mar 1:1 “the Son of God” Comments The underlying theme of the Gospels and Acts is the claim that Jesus Christ is the Son of God; thus, the opening verse of Mark’s Gospel reflects this foundational theme. Jesus was the Son of God the Father by His divine birth through the virgin Mary.

Mar 1:1 Comments - The Title of the Gospel of Mark The opening verse of Mark is often viewed as a title for his Gospel.

Comments The Theme of the Gospel of Mark - The theme of any book in the Holy Bible can be found in the first verse or passage of the book. For example, the opening verse of the Gospel of Mark reflects the preaching ministry of Jesus Christ as He proclaims the arrival of the Kingdom of God, which reflects the secondary theme of the Gospel of Mark: the testimony of the miracles of Jesus Christ through the preaching of the Gospel that Jesus is the Son of God. The opening verse of the Gospel of Matthew reveals the genealogy of Jesus Christ, which is takes the form of a chronological fulfillment of Old Testament Scriptures of the coming of the Messiah, and this verse reflects the secondary theme of Matthew: the testimony of the Old Testament Scriptures that Jesus is the Son of God. The opening verses of Luke’s Gospel make the claim that this book is a collection of eye-witness accounts of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ, which reflects the secondary theme of Luke: the testimony of John the Baptist and other eye witnesses through prophetic utterances that Jesus is the Son of God. The theme of a collection of many testimonies is declared in the closing verse of the Gospel of Luke as well, saying, “And ye are witnesses of these things.” (Luk 24:48)

Comments - The Earliest Form of Preaching - The Gospel of Matthew, which was written first according the early Church tradition, emphasizes the earliest form of preaching by the early Church regarding the Kingdom of God and its teachings. The first Gospel preaching that Jesus taught His disciples to declare was the arrival of the Kingdom of God (Mat 10:7). The message continued to develop as the Holy Spirit moved within the Church. The Gospel of Mark emphasizes the testimony of the miracles of Jesus Christ. These miracles were manifested with the proclamation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Thus, the first verse of Mark declared the theme of his Gospel as the “the beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.”

Mat 10:7, “And as ye go, preach, saying, The kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

Comments - Preaching with Signs and Miracles - As the apostles continued to teach the people how that Jesus Christ was the Messiah, their message was accompanied with signs and miracles (Act 4:33). The need to explain why miracles accompanied the preaching of the apostles brought the need for a Gospel that taught on the miracles of Jesus. Thus, the need for the Gospel of Mark emerged. We see these miracles frequently in the early chapters of the book of Acts as the early Church preached on the Kingdom of God. Thus, Mark reveals his theme when he entitles his writing, “The Beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.” The Gospel of Mark declares its work to be the beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, which message was accompanied by signs following. Note how this theme is stated in the closing verses of his Gospel when Jesus gives the Great Commission, which reads, “And they went forth, and preached every where, the Lord working with them, and confirming the word with signs following. Amen.” (Mar 16:20)

Act 4:33, “And with great power gave the apostles witness of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus: and great grace was upon them all.”

Comments - The Gospel of Jesus Christ - Regarding the question as to whether Mar 1:1 refers to the message preached by Jesus Christ Himself, or to the Gospel message preached by the early church, the answer is found in the structure of the book. This is both a compilation of the preaching ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ, and according to early Church tradition, Mark composed his Gospel as an outline of the messages that was preached by Peter the apostle woven into the story of Jesus. Thus, the answer is that “the Gospel of Jesus Christ” is the Gospel as delivered by Jesus as well as by the early Church.

Mar 1:2  As it is written in the prophets, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee.

Mar 1:2 Old Testament Quotes in the New Testament - Scholars tell us that Mar 2:2 is quoted from Mal 3:1 a.

Mal 3:1, “ Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me : and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts.”

We also see a similar phrase in Exo 23:20 a.

Exo 23:20, “ Behold, I send an Angel before thee , to keep thee in the way, and to bring thee into the place which I have prepared.”

Mar 1:2 “As it is written in the prophets” Comments - Most modern versions translate Mar 1:2 with the words “as it is written in Isaiah the prophet” in contrast to the KJV translation “as it is written in the prophets.” This is because there is strong manuscript attestation for using the word “Isaiah the prophet.” Perhaps the translators of the KJV revised their translation because it is not a quote from the book of Isaiah, but from books of Exodus and Malachi. Thus, they took the paraphrase “as it is written in the prophets” or followed a less attested manuscript that used this phrase.

Mar 1:2 “which shall prepare thy way before thee” - Comments - How was John the Baptist going to do this preparation for the coming of Jesus Christ? Note in verse 5 that all the land went out to him “confessing their sins”. John the Baptist was preparing their hearts for the coming of Jesus, the Messiah, by leading them into repentance.

Mar 1:3  The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.

Mar 1:3 Old Testament Quotes in the New Testament - Mar 1:3 is a quote from Isa 40:3.

Isa 40:3, “The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God.”

Mar 1:3 “make his paths straight” - Comments - Straight paths prevented someone from stumbling (Jer 31:9).

Jer 31:9, “They shall come with weeping, and with supplications will I lead them: I will cause them to walk by the rivers of waters in a straight way, wherein they shall not stumble : for I am a father to Israel, and Ephraim is my firstborn.”

The wicked walk in crooked paths (Isa 59:8).

Isa 59:8, “The way of peace they know not; and there is no judgment in their goings: they have made them crooked paths : whosoever goeth therein shall not know peace.”

Mar 1:3 Comments - Preparing the way of the Lord, making His paths straight, involves repentance. No church has ever had revival except there has been a preparation period. The Lord once spoke to me saying, “This is My house. There will be revival in My house when the sins of the flesh are destroyed.” (Fall 1988)

Illustration - The sons of Israel at Mt. Sinai prepared themselves with three days of sanctification before God’s glory came down.

Verses of Mark 1

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Consult other comments:

Mark 1:1 - Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Mark 1:1 - The Greek Testament

Mark 1:1 - Barclay Daily Study Bible

Mark 1:1 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Mark 1:1 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:1 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Calvin's Complete Commentary

Mark 1:1 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Mark 1:1 - B.H. Carroll's An Interpretation of the English Bible

Mark 1:1 - Through the Bible Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Mark 1:1 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Mark 1:1 - College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

Mark 1:1 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Mark 1:1 - James Gray's Concise Bible Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:1 - John Darby's Synopsis of the New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Mr. D's Notes on Selected New Testament Books by Stanley Derickson

Mark 1:1 - Expositors Bible Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:1 - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Mark 1:1 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Mark 1:1 - Expositor's Dictionary of Text by Robertson

Mark 1:1 - F. B. Hole's Old and New Testaments Commentary

Mark 1:1 - F.B. Meyer's Through the Bible Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Discovering Christ In Selected Books of the Bible

Mark 1:1 - Gaebelein's Annotated Bible (Commentary)

Mark 1:1 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Mark 1:1 - McGarvey and Pendleton Commentaries (New Testament)

Mark 1:1 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Mark 1:1 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Grant's Commentary on the Bible

Mark 1:1 - The Great Texts of the Bible

Mark 1:1 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Mark 1:1 - Smith's Writings on 24 Books of the Bible

Mark 1:1 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:1 - Matthew Henry's Whole Bible Commentary

Mark 1:1 - International Critical Commentary New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Mark 1:1 - Commentaries on the New Testament and Prophets

Mark 1:1 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Mark 1:1 - The Gospel According to St. Mark: A Devotional Commentary

Mark 1:1 - William Kelly Major Works (New Testament)

Mark 1:1 - The Popular Commentary on the Bible by Kretzmann

Mark 1:1 - A Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, Critical, Doctrinal, and Homiletical by Lange

Mark 1:1 - Cornelius Lapide Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Lightfoot Commentary Gospels

Mark 1:1 - Neighbour's Wells of Living Water

Mark 1:1 - Expositions Of Holy Scripture by Alexander MacLaren

Mark 1:1 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Mark 1:1 - An Exposition on the Whole Bible

Mark 1:1 - Church Pulpit Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Grant's Numerical Bible Notes and Commentary

Mark 1:1 - The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

Mark 1:1 - Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Mark 1:1 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Mark 1:1 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Mark 1:1 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Mark 1:1 - The Complete Pulpit Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

Mark 1:1 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Ryle's Expository Thoughts on the Gospels

Mark 1:1 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Scofield Reference Bible Notes

Mark 1:1 - The Sermon Bible

Mark 1:1 - Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:1 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:1 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Mark 1:1 - You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

Mark 1:1 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Mark 1:1 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:1 - Combined Bible Commentary

Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures