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Leviticus 25:10 Commentary - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

(10) And ye shall hallow the fiftieth year.—Because it is here said “Ye shall hallow the fiftieth year,” the authorities during the second Temple inferred that the good work of the jubile is to begin with the first day of Tishri, which is the beginning of the year, and which ought to be hallowed. Hence as new year was with the Hebrews the preparation for the Day of Atonement, so it also became the prelude to the acts of mercy which finally came into operation on the Day of Atonement. They therefore began counting the cycle of the jubile from the first of Tishri, or new year, though they proclaimed it on the tenth, or on the close of the Day of Atonement. In accordance with this the authorities during the second Temple record that “from the Feast of Trumpets [i.e., Tishri 1] till the Day of Atonement [i.e., Tishri 10], the slaves were neither manumitted to return to their homes, nor were made use of by their masters, but ate, drank, rejoiced, and wore garlands; and when the Day of Atonement came the judges blew the cornet, the slaves were manumitted to return to their homes, and the fields were set free.”

And proclaim liberty . . . unto all the inhabitants—That is, to all the Israelites, who are the true possessors of the land. Hence the ancient authorities conclude that the law of jubile was only in force as long as the whole Jewish nation dwelt in the land, but not after the tribes of Reuben and Gad, and half the tribe of Manasseh, were carried into captivity by Pul and Tilgath-Pilneser kings of Assyria (1Ch. 5:26), because “all the inhabitants” of the land dwelt no longer in it. It is from this declaration to proclaim liberty that the year of jubile is also called “the year of freedom” (Eze. 46:17).

It shall be a jubile.—This is an abbreviation of the fuller form, “a year of jubile,” used in the other passages of this chapter (see Lev. 25:13; Lev. 25:28; Lev. 25:40; Lev. 25:50; Lev. 25:52; Lev. 25:54), and denotes “a year proclaimed by the blast of the horn,” since the word yôbel signifies both ram’s horn and the sound emitted from it.

And ye shall return every man.—See Lev. 25:14-16; Lev. 25:23-28.

Every man unto his family.—See Lev. 25:39-40.

Consult other comments:

Leviticus 25:10 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Leviticus 25:10 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Leviticus 25:10 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Leviticus 25:10 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Leviticus 25:10 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 25:10 - Geneva Bible Notes

Leviticus 25:10 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Leviticus 25:10 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 25:10 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Leviticus 25:10 - Church Pulpit Commentary

Leviticus 25:10 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Leviticus 25:10 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 25:10 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Leviticus 25:10 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)