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Leviticus 22:22 Commentary - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

(22) Blind.—Whether totally blind or only of one eye. This blemish also disqualified the priest for the service at the altar (see Lev. 21:18).

Or broken.—Better, broken-limbed (see Exo. 22:9), extending to the head, ribs, &c.

Or maimed.—This was regarded in the time of the second Temple to describe a blemish in the eyebrow. Hence the Chaldee version translates it “one whose eye-brows are fallen off.” It would thus correspond to the defect which unfitted the priest for ministering at the altar.

Or having a wen.—According to the Jewish canonists this denotes a disease of the eyes. Hence the Chaldee version translates it “one whose eyes are smitten with a mixture of white and black,” thus corresponding to the blemish which unfits the priest mentioned in Lev. 21:19.

Or scurvy or scabbed.—These are exactly the same two defects specified with regard to the priests (see Lev. 21:20).

Ye shall not offer these unto the Lord.—Though he must not offer animals with such blemishes, and though the man who vowed them for the sanctuary was beaten with stripes, yet the animals thus sanctified were no more his, he had to redeem them according to valuation, and with the money purchase another oblation.

Consult other comments:

Leviticus 22:22 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Leviticus 22:22 - Calvin's Complete Commentary

Leviticus 22:22 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Leviticus 22:22 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Leviticus 22:22 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 22:22 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Leviticus 22:22 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Leviticus 22:22 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)