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Leviticus 14:7 Commentary - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

(7) And he shall sprinkle.—Having thus dipped the hyssop fastened to the cedar stick into the blood and water, the priest is to sprinkle with it the back of the hand and the forehead of the patient seven times. The seven times symbolised the complete cleansing. (See Lev. 4:6.) Hence Naaman the leper washed himself seven times in the Jordan (2Ki. 5:10; 2Ki. 5:14).

And shall let the living bird loose.—Whereupon the priest not only pronounced the cured man clean and restored to his liberty, but at the same time liberated the bird also. The release of the bird symbolised the freedom restored to the patient, who, like the bird, was now at liberty to go where he liked without any restraint. Because it is here said that the bird is to be let loose “into the open field,” or, more literally, towards the face of the field, the ancient canons decreed that he who lets it loose must not turn his face towards the sea, wilderness, or city, but towards the field. The cedar wood, the crimson thread, and the hyssop, as well as the bird, if caught again, could be used again in the cleansing of other lepers.

Consult other comments:

Leviticus 14:7 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Leviticus 14:7 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Leviticus 14:7 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Leviticus 14:7 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Leviticus 14:7 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Leviticus 14:7 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 14:7 - Geneva Bible Notes

Leviticus 14:7 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Leviticus 14:7 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 14:7 - Church Pulpit Commentary

Leviticus 14:7 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Leviticus 14:7 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 14:7 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)