Bibles

Leviticus 13:31 Commentary - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

(31) It be not in sight deeper than the skin.—Better, its appearance is not deeper than the other skin. If the first symptom which manifests itself in the depression of the affected spot is absent.

And that there is no black hair in it.—Better, but there is no black hair in it; that is, the healthy black colour of the hair is absent, which is a suspicious sign. The phrase, “there is no black hair in it,” is another way of saying “there is yellow hair in it.” The presence of yellow hair, however, on the first inspection, though suspicious, did not necessarily indicate by itself leprosy, since the hair sometimes turned yellow temporarily in the case of an ordinary ulcer, and resumed its natural black colour when the patient returned to his usual health. Hence, the absence of the black hair was simply a suspicious symptom, which required the attention of the priest, for which reason the patient had to be put in quarantine for seven days. The alteration of the word “black” into “yellow,” which has been adopted by those commentators who follow the LXX.,is therefore unnecessary. Indeed, if this reading be adopted, both the unfavourable symptoms mentioned in Lev. 13:30, which indicate leprosy—viz., (1) the depression of the affected spot, and (2) the discolouring of the hair—would be absent. There would be no reason for quarantine, as the priest in the absence of these criteria would have to pronounce the man clean. (See Lev. 13:37.)

Consult other comments:

Leviticus 13:31 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Leviticus 13:31 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Leviticus 13:31 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Leviticus 13:31 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Leviticus 13:31 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Leviticus 13:31 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Leviticus 13:31 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)