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Mark 1:40 Commentary - Mr. D's Notes on Selected New Testament Books by Stanley Derickson

40 And there came a leper to him, beseeching him, and kneeling down to him, and saying unto him, If thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. 41 And Jesus, moved with compassion, put forth [his] hand, and touched him, and saith unto him, I will; be thou clean. 42 And as soon as he had spoken, immediately the leprosy departed from him, and he was cleansed.

We see first of all the faith of the man - a belief that he could be clean. Second we see something new in the account of healings and that would be that the Lord moved via compassion, not some Messianic bestowal of a gift or a Messianic power trip but from simple compassion.

I wondered when working through some of the other healing accounts whether Christ was doing these things out of compassion or as just a sign for the people. This brings up another question to ponder. Since he was moving with compassion, had He not been compassionate of nature, would He have healed at all?

The simple answer to this of course is that compassion is part of God's nature so it is a mute point. Add to this the fact that Christ's ministry was set from eternity past, the compassion and the healing were built into the plan. On the simple observation side, knowing Christ's life and manner in the Gospels aside from the healing, would indicate a compassionate man. He was a man of peace and was concerned about the people and concern normally comes from compassion.

Now back to the faith of the man for a moment. He came to Christ knowing that healing was possible, he came knowing it was up to Christ whether it would happen or not and third he came with a worshipful attitude when he kneeled before the Lord.

I thought it interesting that Christ responded specifically and verbally to the request ("I will") as well as physically by healing him. I don't know if that is important or not, but seems rather important in the situation. He could have just done it and walked away, yet he uttered a verbal response to the man's request. Indeed all three gospels that record this occurrence state the "I will" in their account.

Luke gives us a little more information in that Luke states that the man was "full" of leprosy. He was in full blown condition - a very sorry case to be sure, and yet Christ, according to the same three gospels, Christ reached forth and touched the man. That is a lot of compassion one might observe.

The three writers record the man's posture differently. Mark mentions "kneeling" while Matthewmentions "worshipped him" while Luke records "he fell on his face, and besought him" all different aspects to what they observed. The term besought may be a little strong in the translation. The Greek word means simply something requested or desired.

Consult other comments:

Mark 1:40 - Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Mark 1:40 - The Greek Testament

Mark 1:40 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Mark 1:40 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:40 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Mark 1:40 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Mark 1:40 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Mark 1:40 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Mark 1:40 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:40 - Mr. D's Notes on Selected New Testament Books by Stanley Derickson

Mark 1:40 - Expositors Bible Commentary

Mark 1:40 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:40 - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Mark 1:40 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Mark 1:40 - F.B. Meyer's Through the Bible Commentary

Mark 1:40 - Discovering Christ In Selected Books of the Bible

Mark 1:40 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Mark 1:40 - McGarvey and Pendleton Commentaries (New Testament)

Mark 1:40 - Geneva Bible Notes

Mark 1:40 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Mark 1:40 - William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:40 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Mark 1:40 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:40 - Matthew Henry's Whole Bible Commentary

Mark 1:40 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Mark 1:40 - The Gospel According to St. Mark: A Devotional Commentary

Mark 1:40 - A Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, Critical, Doctrinal, and Homiletical by Lange

Mark 1:40 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Mark 1:40 - Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Mark 1:40 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Mark 1:40 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Mark 1:40 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Mark 1:40 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

Mark 1:40 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Mark 1:40 - Ryle's Expository Thoughts on the Gospels

Mark 1:40 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:40 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Mark 1:40 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Mark 1:40 - You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

Mark 1:40 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Mark 1:40 - Combined Bible Commentary

Mr. D's Notes on Selected New Testament Books by Stanley Derickson