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Verses of Revelation 20

8

Revelation 20:8 Commentary - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

8. the nations which are &c.] It almost seems as though the kingdom of Christ and of His Saints had not been world-wide, but had been, like the Roman empire of St John’s day, or the Christendom of our own, a wide but limited region of light in the midst of a barbarous world. It is not therefore certain that the coming of the kingdom must be postponed till Christianity has gained its victory over the compact mass of nations which, from China to Guinea, still hold out against it: and we ought to remember the possibility, that they may prove as dangerous to the fabric of modern civilisation as the barbarians of Scythia, Germany, and Arabia proved to the ancient. But it is possible that this prediction refers, not to an incursion from outlying heathens, but to an apostasy of outlying Christians. If so, this may be illustrated by the way that the remoter provinces of Christendom fell into heresy in the fifth and following centuries, and were, in great measure as a consequence, absorbed in Islam afterwards. We may also think of the many wild and unchristian sects rising in our own time in America and in Russia the countries of Christendom remotest from its centres of intellectual life.

quarters ] Better, corners.

Gog and Magog ] See Ezekiel 38, 39 a prophecy which may, for aught we know, have had some nearly contemporary fulfilment, but which the Jewish traditions interpret of a war in the days of the Messiah, nearly as here. Magog is given in Gen 10:2 as the name of a son of Japhet, the eponymus, there is no doubt, of one of the nations lying near the Black Sea, and called by Europeans Scythian in the wide sense. Gog appears in Ezek. l.c. to be not a national name, but the name, whether personal or dynastic, of the king of Magog and the neighbouring or kindred tribes of Rosh, Meshech, and Tubal. The resemblance of two of these names to the modern Russia and Muscovy is merely accidental: but it would be rash to deny the possibility, that the geographical or ethnological suggestion is to be taken literally, and that St John does foretell an invasion, something like that of the Huns, or Tartars, and falling on Christendom from the same quarter.

to gather them &c.] Nearly a repetition of Rev 16:14, Rev 17:12; Rev 17:14, Rev 19:19. Yet it can hardly describe the same event: it seems plain that, whatever be the meaning of the first resurrection and the thousand years’ reign, they intervene between that war and this. Moreover, the former war was on the part of the rulers of the civilised world, this on the part of the outer barbarians.

Verses of Revelation 20

8

Consult other comments:

Revelation 20:8 - Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Revelation 20:8 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Revelation 20:8 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Revelation 20:8 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Revelation 20:8 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Revelation 20:8 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Revelation 20:8 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Revelation 20:8 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Revelation 20:8 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Revelation 20:8 - Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Revelation 20:8 - Geneva Bible Notes

Revelation 20:8 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Revelation 20:8 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 20:8 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Revelation 20:8 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Revelation 20:8 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Revelation 20:8 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 20:8 - Scofield Reference Bible Notes

Revelation 20:8 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Revelation 20:8 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Revelation 20:8 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Revelation 20:8 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges