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Verses of Song of Solomon 5

1

Song of Solomon 5:1 Commentary - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Ch. Son 5:1. The great question regarding this verse is how the perfect tenses in it are to be understood. Some maintain that they must be rigorously taken as perfects; others think that they should be understood in one or other of the modified perfect senses which this tense may have in Heb. Grammatically we may render either, I have come, or I come (cp. Ges. Gr. § 106 i); or lastly I will come, perf. of confidence (Ges. § 106 n). Those who, like Delitzsch, suppose that the marriage has taken place, take the first; Budde, who regards the song as one sung after the marriage has been celebrated, but during the week of festivities, takes the second; those who regard the marriage as still in the future cannot but take the perfs. in the third sense. In that case the words indicate that after what the bride has revealed of her love, the bridegroom feels that the marriage is as good as accomplished.

I have gathered my myrrh with my spice ] Rather, I have plucked my myrrh with my balsam.

eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved ] The chief difficulty here is whether dôdhîm, the word translated ‘friends,’ should not be rendered ‘caresses,’ as it has meant hitherto throughout the book, or whether it is to be taken in the sense of ‘beloved friends,’ as its parallelism to rç‘îm would suggest. That dôdhîm may have this latter meaning seems clear, for in many languages the abstract word, ‘love,’ is used in a concrete signification. On the whole this rendering beloved friends seems the best here. Siegfried seeks to establish a distinction between dôdhîm written defectively ( רדים ), and the same word written fully ( רֹודים ), the former being used, he says, only of caresses, the latter of friends, quoting König, Lehrgeb. vol. 11. 2, 262 b. He translates, “Eat ye too, O companions, and intoxicate yourselves, O friends,” and says that the clause would mean in prose, ‘do ye marry also.’ But in that case some way of emphasising the ye would have been expected. It seems preferable to understand the words of an invitation to his friends to come to the marriage feast he has spoken of as being as good as made (Ewald).

drink abundantly ] That the bridegroom should invite them to drink to satiety is in accord with what would appear to have been the custom, viz. to shew sympathy at such a feast by departing from the habitual abstemiousness of the East in regard to wine. Cp. Joh 2:10, the marriage at Cana of Galilee. That shâkhar may mean merely to drink to satiety, not to drunkenness, is proved by Hag 1:6, “Ye eat, but ye have not enough, ye drink, but ye are not filled with drink”; where lěsŏbh âh is parallel to lěshokhr âh. Some prefer to take the last clause as an address by the daughters of Jerusalem (Ginsburg), or by the poet to the young pair (Hitzig).

Chap. Son 4:8 Chap. Son 5:1. A true Lover’s Pleading

With Son 4:8 a new song, representing another scene, begins. In it the peasant lover of the Shulammite comes to beseech her to flee from the mountain region where she is detained, the home of wild beasts and the scene of other dangers. In Son 4:9-15 he breaks forth into a passionate lyric, expressive of his love for her, and in Son 4:16 she replies, yielding to his love and his entreaties. Ch. Son 5:1 contains his reply.

Verses of Song of Solomon 5

1

Consult other comments:

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Song of Solomon 5:1 - B.H. Carroll's An Interpretation of the English Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Through the Bible Commentary

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Song of Solomon 5:1 - College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Expositors Bible Commentary

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Expositor's Dictionary of Text by Robertson

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Discovering Christ In Selected Books of the Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Gaebelein's Annotated Bible (Commentary)

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Geneva Bible Notes

Song of Solomon 5:1 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Smith's Writings on 24 Books of the Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Matthew Henry's Whole Bible Commentary

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Commentaries on the New Testament and Prophets

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

Song of Solomon 5:1 - William Kelly Major Works (New Testament)

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Popular Commentary on the Bible by Kretzmann

Song of Solomon 5:1 - A Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, Critical, Doctrinal, and Homiletical by Lange

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Song of Solomon 5:1 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Complete Pulpit Commentary

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Bible of the Expositor and the Evangelist by Riley

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Sermon Bible

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Song of Solomon 5:1 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 5:1 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Song of Solomon 5:1 - You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

Song of Solomon 5:1 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges