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Verses of Song of Solomon 4

8

Song of Solomon 4:8 Commentary - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

8. The order of the words in the Heb. is specially, emphatic, With me from Lebanon, O bride, with me from Lebanon do thou come. Evidently a contrast between the speaker and some other is here intended. Come with me, do not remain with him. This strongly supports the view that Solomon is endeavouring to win the maiden’s love which has been given to another. Budde, finding the verse quite unintelligible on his hypothesis, excises it, but violence of that kind is not necessary. The Shulammite is at this point in some royal residence in the Lebanon, and her lover calls upon her to leave Solomon and come with him to her home. The reference to lions and leopards may be intended to indicate also her hostile surroundings in other respects. Cp. the Mo‘allaqa of Antar, Son 5:6, where the loved one among a hostile tribe is said to be “dwelling among the roaring ones,” i.e. the lions. Lions formerly inhabited Bashan at least, cp. Deu 33:22. Tristram, Nat. Hist. p. 116, says they lingered in Palestine till the time of the Crusades, and they are mentioned as living about Samaria by historians of the 12th century. Leopards are and always have been common in Palestine. They are a pest to herdsmen in Gilead even now. (Tristram, p. 113.)

look from the top of Amana ] The verb shûr has generally in Heb. the meaning ‘to look round’; but in common with other verbs of looking in a direction, it also means ‘to go in a direction’ (Isa 57:9). Occurring as it does in this passage in parallelism with ‘come,’ it most probably has the latter meaning. Cp. R.V. marg. We should therefore translate depart from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions’ dens, &c. In this way too the lions’ dens and the mountains of the leopards gain a significance which they have not if the word be translated look. He warns her to flee from Lebanon as being full of dangers. Ăm ânâ is generally held to be the district in which the river Ăm ânâh (2Ki 5:12, Qěr ç for the Kěth îbh, Ăb ânâh) rises. This is either the Barada which flows from Anti-Libanus, or the other river of Damascus, which flows from the slopes of Hermon. Others, as Budde, think of the Amanus of the ancients, i.e. the spur of the Taurus lying to the north of the Orontes. The former is much the more probable.

Shenir ] or Senir. Hermon is the highest peak of the Anti-Lebanon range. It is called Sion in Deu 4:48. By the Amorites it was called Sěn îr, and by the Sidonians Siryôn (Deu 3:9). It has three peaks, and the names Hermon and Sěn îr, distinguished in 1Ch 5:23, Son 4:8, may refer to two of the peaks. Cp. the Hermons of Psa 42:6 ( Oxf. Lex. p. 356).

Chap. Son 4:8 Chap. Son 5:1. A true Lover’s Pleading

With Son 4:8 a new song, representing another scene, begins. In it the peasant lover of the Shulammite comes to beseech her to flee from the mountain region where she is detained, the home of wild beasts and the scene of other dangers. In Son 4:9-15 he breaks forth into a passionate lyric, expressive of his love for her, and in Son 4:16 she replies, yielding to his love and his entreaties. Ch. Son 5:1 contains his reply.

Verses of Song of Solomon 4

8

Consult other comments:

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Song of Solomon 4:8 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Song of Solomon 4:8 - College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Geneva Bible Notes

Song of Solomon 4:8 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Matthew Henry's Whole Bible Commentary

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

Song of Solomon 4:8 - The Popular Commentary on the Bible by Kretzmann

Song of Solomon 4:8 - The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Song of Solomon 4:8 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Song of Solomon 4:8 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Song of Solomon 4:8 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Song of Solomon 4:8 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Song of Solomon 4:8 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges