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John 5:18 Commentary - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, The Jews instead of being satisfied, were the more enraged; not only because he had violated the sabbath (as they pretended) by healing the cripple on the sabbath-day, but because Christ had asserted that God was his Father in a peculiar manner, and made himself equal with God, our Saviour therefore goes on to assert his equality and conjunction with the Father in his operations and workings; which doth at once justify his work on the Sabbath-day, and prove him to be truly and really God. Now our holy Lord, to prove himself equal with God the Father produces first many arguments, to verse 31, and then alledges the testimony of many witnesses to the end of the chapter.

Our Saviour's first argument to prove himself equal with the Father in essence and nature, is this, that the Father and he are equal in operation, in will and consent for working; that the Son doth all that the Father doth, and the Father doth nothing without the Son, ver 19. The Son can do nothing of himself; that is, as man, as the Messias, and as Mediator, he could do nothing of himself. His perfect obedience to, and compliance with, the will of his Father that sent him, would not suffer him to do any thing without him: but as God, he could do all things of himself.

Learn hence, That it is an undeniable proof that the Father and Son are one in nature, essence, and being; in that they are inseparable in operation and working; What things soever the Father doth, these also doth the Son likewise; and the Son doth nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do: therefore Father and Son being equal in operation and working, are equal in nature and being; and consequently, both essentially, truly and really, God: Therefore the Arians of old, and the Socinians at this day, are wide when they produce this text? The Son can do nothing of himself, to prove that Christ is not equal with God the Father, They forget or neglect to distinguish between his divine nature, which could do all things, and his mediatorial office: which could not do, but what the Father that sent him had appointed him to do.

Consult other comments:

John 5:18 - The Greek Testament

John 5:18 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

John 5:18 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

John 5:18 - Calvin's Complete Commentary

John 5:18 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

John 5:18 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

John 5:18 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

John 5:18 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

John 5:18 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

John 5:18 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

John 5:18 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

John 5:18 - Geneva Bible Notes

John 5:18 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

John 5:18 - Gnomon of the New Testament

John 5:18 - Godet Commentary (Luke, John, Romans and 1 Corinthians)

John 5:18 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

John 5:18 - The Apologists Bible Commentary

John 5:18 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

John 5:18 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

John 5:18 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

John 5:18 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

John 5:18 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

John 5:18 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

John 5:18 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 5:18 - Scofield Reference Bible Notes

John 5:18 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

John 5:18 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

John 5:18 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

John 5:18 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

John 5:18 - Combined Bible Commentary

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament