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Verses of Luke 18

1

Luke 18:1 Commentary - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

There is no duty in Christianity, the practice of which our Saviour pressed upon us more frequently than this duty of prayer. To encourage his disciples, (and us in them,) to fervency, importunity, and perseverance in this duty, he propounds here the parable of an unjust judge, who was overcome by an importunate widow, to do her justice contrary to his own inclination.

From whence our Saviour argues, that if importunity will prevail with a sinful man, to grant petitions offered to him; how much more prevalent will such importunity be with the infinitely good God, to relieve the necessities of such as devoutly implore his help. And the force of the argument lies thus: "The judge in the parable was an inferior and subordinate judge, was an unrighteous and unjust judge, was a merciless and hard hearted judge; and yet, upon her importunity, he avenged her: how much more will the sovereign and supreme Judge, the holy and righteous, the merciful and compassionate Judge of all the earth, hear and help his praying people, and be the just Avenger of those that fear him"

From the whole note,

1. That prayer, or a liberty of making our requests known to God, is an inestimable favor and privilege. He that considers the nature of God, and the nature of man, cannot question it: God is a being of infinite fullness and perfection; a self- sufficient, and an all-sufficient good; and man an indigent, helpless, dependent creature, full of wants, and obnoxious to dangers.

2. That prayer is not only an inestimable privilege, but an indispensable duty. So solicitous is God for our welfare and happiness, that he makes our privilege our duty, by the authority of his command; so that we are at once ungrateful to God, and unjust to ourselves, in the most exalted degree, if we do not pray unto him, and spread our wants before him.

3. That this duty of prayer is not an occasional, but a constant duty: Men ought always to pray; that is,

1. At all seasonable times and fit opportunities. We are said to do it seasonably; now the seasons for prayer are morning and evening. As the morning and evening sacrifice was constant among the Jews, and the fire was always upon the altar, and never went out; so he that prays morning and evening, may be said to be instant in prayer, and to pray without ceasing.

2. Always to pray, is an endeavor always to keep the heart in a praying frame, and to be very frequent in offering up pious exclamations, and short mental prayers to God, as occasion shall offer; when in the field, in the shop, in the bed, when sleep departs, in the journey when alone. This may be done advantageously without loss of time, and acceptably without danger of hypocrisy, which too often mingles itself with our more set prayers.

Observe, 4. We must not only pray constantly, but pray fervently, yea, importunately; if we would pray successfully, we must cry to God as the widow to the judge: vehemency and importunity are both helps and ornaments to prayer; they both fortify and beautify our prayers; they pierce the heavens, and offer an holy violence to God: Tertullian says, "God delights in such importunity."

Nevertheless, when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? If by the Son of man's coming we understand Christ's coming in judgment against Jerusalem, then the sense is this; "That when he comes to take vengeance on the obstinate Jews, and to destroy their city, he will find but little faith, and patient waiting for help from God in the land of Judea, and consequently little importuning him with incessant cries and supplications as this poor woman did the unjust judge."

If by the Son of man's coming, we understand Christ's coming to judge the world at the last day, then the sense is, "When he cometh, he will find but few faithful ones, comparatively speaking; he will find but few sincere and serious Christians, in whom the genuine effectws and fruits are found."

Learn, that when Christ shall come to judgment, he will find comparatively very few whose hearts have not fainted, and very many, who through the power that temptation has upon the frailty of human nature are fallen away: When the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? Verily, but little faith, and few faithful ones.

Verses of Luke 18

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Consult other comments:

Luke 18:1 - Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Luke 18:1 - The Greek Testament

Luke 18:1 - Barclay Daily Study Bible

Luke 18:1 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Luke 18:1 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 18:1 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Calvin's Complete Commentary

Luke 18:1 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Luke 18:1 - B.H. Carroll's An Interpretation of the English Bible

Luke 18:1 - Through the Bible Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Luke 18:1 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Luke 18:1 - College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

Luke 18:1 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Luke 18:1 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 18:1 - John Darby's Synopsis of the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Expositors Bible Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 18:1 - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Luke 18:1 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Luke 18:1 - Expositor's Dictionary of Text by Robertson

Luke 18:1 - F. B. Hole's Old and New Testaments Commentary

Luke 18:1 - F.B. Meyer's Through the Bible Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Discovering Christ In Selected Books of the Bible

Luke 18:1 - Gaebelein's Annotated Bible (Commentary)

Luke 18:1 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Geneva Bible Notes

Luke 18:1 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Luke 18:1 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Godet Commentary (Luke, John, Romans and 1 Corinthians)

Luke 18:1 - Grant's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 18:1 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Luke 18:1 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 18:1 - Matthew Henry's Whole Bible Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 18:1 - International Critical Commentary New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Luke 18:1 - Commentaries on the New Testament and Prophets

Luke 18:1 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 18:1 - William Kelly Major Works (New Testament)

Luke 18:1 - The Popular Commentary on the Bible by Kretzmann

Luke 18:1 - A Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, Critical, Doctrinal, and Homiletical by Lange

Luke 18:1 - Cornelius Lapide Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Lightfoot Commentary Gospels

Luke 18:1 - Expositions Of Holy Scripture by Alexander MacLaren

Luke 18:1 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Luke 18:1 - An Exposition on the Whole Bible

Luke 18:1 - Church Pulpit Commentary

Luke 18:1 - The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

Luke 18:1 - Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 18:1 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Luke 18:1 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Luke 18:1 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Luke 18:1 - The Complete Pulpit Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

Luke 18:1 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Ryle's Expository Thoughts on the Gospels

Luke 18:1 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Scofield Reference Bible Notes

Luke 18:1 - The Sermon Bible

Luke 18:1 - Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the Bible

Luke 18:1 - Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 18:1 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 18:1 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Luke 18:1 - You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

Luke 18:1 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Luke 18:1 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 18:1 - Combined Bible Commentary

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament