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Verses of Luke 13

8

Luke 13:8 Commentary - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. The vine-dresser's petition and request, Lord, let it alone this year also. This points out unto us the office and duty of the ministers of God, who are laborers in his vineyard, to be intercessors with God, for sparing a barren and unfruitful people. Lord, spare them a little longer, Let alone this year also. If they cannot absolutely prevent judgment coming upon an unfruitful people, yet they endeavor to respite it, and delay its coming all they can.

Observe, 2. The condition upon which the vine-dresser's petition is grounded, Till I shall dig about it, and dung it; phrases which intimate unto us the nature and quality of the ministerial work and service, signifying it to be a very difficult and laborious service. Digging is a painful work, and a spending work: and such is our ministerial work, if followed as it ought to be. We deal in mysteries, in the deep things of God, which are not received without much digging.

Observe, 3. A double supposition here made by the vine-dresser:

First, of future fruitfulness; If it bear fruit, well.

Secondly, of future incorrigibleness; If not, after that thou shalt cut it down.

Here is a supposition of future fruitfulness; If it bear fruit, well; that is, it will be well for the Master of the vineyard; herein is he glorified, when his fig trees bear much fruit: well for the dresser of the vineyard; it rejoices the ministers of God to see their people bring forth fruit unto God: well for the vineyard, and the rest of the trees that are in it: but more especially well for the tree itself, thereby avoiding the punishment of barrenness, and procuring the reward of fruitfulness; thus, If it bear fruit, well.

Here is a supposition of future incorrigibleness, After that thou shalt cut it down: that is, after thou hast spared it, and I have pruned it; after thy patience and my pains; after thou hast forborne it, and I have manured it, digged and dunged it; if after all this, it bear no fruit, then I have not a word more to say, Thou shalt cut it down. Thou may cut it down, nobody will go about to hinder thee.

From hence learn, that a people's continued unfruitfulness under the means of grace, does in time take off the prayers and intercessions of the ministers of God for them, and provokes God to bring his judgments unavoidably and irrevocably upon them: After that thou shalt cut it down.

Verses of Luke 13

8

Consult other comments:

Luke 13:8 - The Greek Testament

Luke 13:8 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 13:8 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Luke 13:8 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Luke 13:8 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Luke 13:8 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 13:8 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 13:8 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Luke 13:8 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Luke 13:8 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Luke 13:8 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:8 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Luke 13:8 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 13:8 - Lightfoot Commentary Gospels

Luke 13:8 - Church Pulpit Commentary

Luke 13:8 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Luke 13:8 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Luke 13:8 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:8 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 13:8 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Luke 13:8 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 13:8 - Combined Bible Commentary

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament