Bibles

Luke 12:22 Commentary - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

There is a twofold sense and interpretation given of these verses.

1. Some take them as spoken only to the apostles, directing them absolutely to cast off all care for the things of this life, that so they might attend upon Christ's person, and wholly give up themselves to that work to which he had called them: and therefore St. Luke here takes notice, that after he had cautioned his hearers in general against covetousness, he applies himself particularly to his disciples, and tells them, that he would have them so far from this sin of covetousness, that they should not use that ordinary care, and common industry about the things of this life, which is not only lawful but necessary for men in all ordinary cases, verse 22. And he said unto his disciples, therefore I say unto you, take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat or drink. But if we understand the words in this sense, we must look upon it only as a temporary command, given to the apostles for that time only; like that in St. Matthew Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass, in your purses: neither coat nor scrip; Mat 10:9 which no man ever understood as a general law to all Christians, but as a particular precept to the apostles at that time.

2. Others understand these injunctions of our Saviour to be consistent with a prudent and provident care of the things of this life, not forbidding a regular industry and diligence for the obtaining of them, but condemning only an anxious, vexatious, tormenting care, and an over solicitious diligence for the things of this life; and taking our Saviour's words for a general and standing rule to all Christians, they only forbid distrustful thoughfulness, distracting cares, which drive a man's mind this way and that way, (like meteors or clouds in the air, as the word signifies.)

Now against this vexatious care, and solicitious thoughfulness, our Saviour propounds many weighty arguments or considerations; four especially. He tells us, such cares are needless, fruitless, heathenish, and brutish.

1. It is needless: Your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of these things, and will certainly provide for you; and what need you take care, and God too? Cast your care upon him.

2. It is fruitless: Which of you by taking thought can add one cubit to his stature? We may sooner by our carping care add a furlong to our grief, than a cubit to our comfort. All our own care, without God's help, will neither feed us when we are hungry, nor nourish us when we are fed.

3. It is heathenish: After all these things do the Gentiles seek, Mat 6:32 The ends and objects of a Christian's thoughts ought to be higher and more sublime than that of heathens.

4. Lastly, it is brutish, no, worse than brutish. The birds of the air, the beasts of the field, the ravens of the valley, all are fed and sustained by God, without any care of their own; much more shall his children. Has God a breakfast ready for every little bird that comes chirping out of its nest, and for every beast of the field that comes leaping out of its den; and will he not much more provide for you? Surely, that God that feeds the ravens when they cry, will not starve his children when they pray.

Consult other comments:

Luke 12:22 - Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Luke 12:22 - The Greek Testament

Luke 12:22 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Luke 12:22 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 12:22 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Luke 12:22 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Luke 12:22 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Luke 12:22 - Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

Luke 12:22 - College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

Luke 12:22 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Luke 12:22 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 12:22 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 12:22 - Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Luke 12:22 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Luke 12:22 - F.B. Meyer's Through the Bible Commentary

Luke 12:22 - Discovering Christ In Selected Books of the Bible

Luke 12:22 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Luke 12:22 - Geneva Bible Notes

Luke 12:22 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Luke 12:22 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 12:22 - William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 12:22 - Godet Commentary (Luke, John, Romans and 1 Corinthians)

Luke 12:22 - Henry Alford's Greek Testament

Luke 12:22 - Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 12:22 - Matthew Henry's Whole Bible Commentary

Luke 12:22 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Luke 12:22 - Commentaries on the New Testament and Prophets

Luke 12:22 - Jamieson, Fausset and Brown's Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 12:22 - The Popular Commentary on the Bible by Kretzmann

Luke 12:22 - Expositions Of Holy Scripture by Alexander MacLaren

Luke 12:22 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Luke 12:22 - Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 12:22 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Luke 12:22 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Luke 12:22 - The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Luke 12:22 - Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

Luke 12:22 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Luke 12:22 - Ryle's Expository Thoughts on the Gospels

Luke 12:22 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 12:22 - Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the Bible

Luke 12:22 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 12:22 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Luke 12:22 - You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

Luke 12:22 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Luke 12:22 - Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 12:22 - Combined Bible Commentary

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament