Bibles

Luke 10:5 Commentary - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here our blessed Saviour directs his disciples how to manage themselves in the executing of their office: Into whatsoever house ye enter, first say, Peace be to this house; they must with peace to the sons of peace, yea, to the enemies of peace also; and as their peace shall rest upon the one, so shall it return from the other. Peace be to this house, is a fit salutation for them to use, who were the disciples and ambassadors of the Prince of peace; and very agreeable to the gospel they were to preach, which was a gospel of peace: and it was a prayer as well as a salutation; the disciples were to speak it not from the lip only, but from the heart also. Peace is the music which both men and angels are delighted with, and the Christian religion is the greatest promoter and preserver of it, that commands us to pray for peace, to follow after peace, to part with our coat and cloak, that is, with our civil rights, for peace; and, if it be possible, to live peaceably with all men.

Observe, 2. As the injunction given by our Saviour to his disciples to deliver a message of peace, first say, Peace be to this house: so the prediction of what should befall them in the delivery of this their message. Their salutation, though it be peace, yet will not find a welcome and entertainment with all persons, but only with the sons of peace: If the sons of peace be there, your peace shall rest upon it.

Observe, 3. An encouragement not to be afraid of delivering their message though it wanted success: If your peace rest not, it shall return to you again.

Learn,

1. That as there was at the first preaching of the gospel, so there is, and always will be, some that are sons of peace, and others that are enemies unto peace.

2. That this peace will rest on none but those that are fit to receive it. That though it does not rest, yet it shall not be lost, but return again to those that publish it. Ministers can but say, Peace be to this house, they cannot make it rest there; we can offer terms of peace to a lost world, but cannot compel men to accept them; and if they finally refuse them, we shall be a sweet savour unto God, as well in them that perish, as in them that are saved.

Consult other comments:

Luke 10:5 - Albert Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Luke 10:5 - Joseph Benson’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 10:5 - Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Luke 10:5 - The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

Luke 10:5 - Adam Clarke's Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

Luke 10:5 - Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Luke 10:5 - Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 10:5 - Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 10:5 - The Expositor’s Greek Testament by Robertson

Luke 10:5 - Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Luke 10:5 - John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Luke 10:5 - Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:5 - Godet Commentary (Luke, John, Romans and 1 Corinthians)

Luke 10:5 - Biblical Illustrator Edited by Joseph S. Exell

Luke 10:5 - Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer's New Testament Commentary

Luke 10:5 - Church Pulpit Commentary

Luke 10:5 - Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Luke 10:5 - English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

Luke 10:5 - Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Luke 10:5 - A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:5 - John Trapp's Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

Luke 10:5 - The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Luke 10:5 - Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament

Luke 10:5 - Combined Bible Commentary

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament